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Faculty Choice Awards

Our FIU Online faculty are leaders of innovative course design and delivery. The Faculty Choice Awards aim to honor faculty's continuing efforts in improving the student experience within the world of online learning, and serve as FIU Online's commitment to quality. Faculty are able to self-nominate one of their fully online courses for a Faculty Choice Award in one of 5 categories. A panel of faculty judges rates each nomination with a set rubric and selects the winners.

Faculty are able to self-nominate one of their fully online courses for a Faculty Choice Award in one of 5 categories.

A panel of faculty judges rates each nomination with a set rubric and selects the winners.

Categories

Excellence in Learner Engagement - Recognizes extraordinary commitment, initiative, and dedication in designing and facilitating engagment in an online course.

Innovative Course Design - recognizes a course that uses unique design aspects as a means to edeliver quality course content.

Best Use of Technology - recognizes an instructor whose creative and effictive use of an educational technology tool enhances the learning environment for students in the course.

Online Course of the Year - Recognizes an instructor whose QM certified course promotes excellent pedagogical design and innovation in online teaching and learning.

Past Winners

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2018 Awards

Award Professor ID
Student Engagement Irma Alonso Jennifer Echeverri
Innovative Use of Open Content Elio Arteaga Felson Thomas-Watson
Innovative Course Design Melody Willoughby Erika Huezo
Creative Tool Usage Marcela Lopez Bravo ID- Gali Lefkowitz & Melody Willoughby Erika Huezo
Top Score in Gamification Lukas Danner Nina Crutchfield

QM Certified Courses

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2017 Awards

Award Professor ID
Student Engagement Maria Reid Emmanuel Franco
Innovative Use of Open Content (Tie) Anjana Mishra Nina Crutchfield
Rodolfo Rego Claudia Fernandez
Innovative Course Design Professor Melody Whiddon Willoughby Erika Huezo
Creative Tool Usage Professor Roxanna Corradino Bernadette Chung
Top Score in Gamification Lukas Danner Nina Crutchfield

QM Certified Courses

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2016 Awards

Award Course Professor
Creative Tools Usage GEO3501 - Earth Resources Rodolfo Rego
PSB4002 - Introduction to Bio-Psychology Michael Chen
Innovative Course Design PAD5934 - Contemporary Issues in Public Administration Michael Brown
Student Engagement EIN5226 - Total Quality Management for Engineers Karen Schmahl
Use of Open Content IDS3336 - Artistic Expression in a Global Society Michael Rodriguez

QM Certified Courses

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2015 Awards

Award Course Professor
Student Engagement CLP4314 - Childhood Psychopathology Rachel Ritchie
PSY4931 - Senior Seminar in Psychology Rachel Ritchie
REL3308 - Studies in World Religions Erin Weston
Open Content EEC3315 - Play and the Development of Social Competence Daniela Foerch and Carolina Arbolead
Creative Tool Use NGR7769 - Patient Safety and Quality Improvement in Healthcare Derrick Glymph
NUR3821 - Professional Nursing Leadership: Concepts and Issues Elizabeth Azutillo
Innovative Course Design CJJ3010 - Juvenile Justice Rosa Chang

QM Certified Courses

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2014 Awards

Award Course Professor
Innovative Use of Open Content EEC3400 - Family Literacy and the Young Child Daniela Foerch
Top Score in Gamification ENT4113 - Entrepreneurship: New Business Development Kaihan Krippendorff
Creative Tool Usage MAR4643 - Decision Making and Negotiations Kimberly Taylor
Student Engagement NUR3821 - Professional Nursing Leadership: Concepts and Issues Elizabeth Azutillo

Rules

Rules
  • Submissions for the 2019 Faculty Choice Awards are due by Friday, September 27, 2019.
  • The course must have run one full semester (ex. eligible courses for 2019 are from Fall 2018, Spring 2019, or Summer 2019).
  • Courses that were previously submitted and won an award, are not eligible to win again. Courses must be self-nominated by the faculty who taught the course.
  • Faculty are eligible to submit 1 course per category.

The Award of Excellence in Online Learner Engagement recognizes extraordinary commitment, initiative and dedication in designing and facilitating for engagement in an online course.

Excellence in Online Learner Engagement Rubric
Faculty Choice Award

Criteria Exemplary (2) Accomplished (1) Incomplete (0)
Interactive Learning Activities Course provides specific details and/or examples of opportunities for interaction that support active learning in three types: learner-content, learner-instructor, or learner- learner. Course provides specific details and/or examples of opportunities for interaction that support active learning in two types: learner-content, learner-instructor, or learner- learner. Course does not provide specific details and/or examples of opportunities for interaction that support active learning in at least one of the three types:: Learner-content, learner-instructor, or learner-learner.
Instructor Presence Course provides specific details and/or examples of how the instructor keeps consistent instructor presence throughout the course; does not provide regular feedback; and/or the does not state the instructor’s plan for interacting with learners during the course. Course provides some specific details and/or examples that demonstrate/describe consistent instructor presence throughout the course; sometimes provides feedback to learners; and states the instructor’s plan for interacting with learners during the course. Course does not provide specific details and/or examples of how the instructor keeps consistent instructor presence throughout the course; does not regular feedback; and/or does not state the instructor’s plan for interacting with learners during the course.
Course Tools Course provides details and/or examples that clearly support how tools used in the course promote active learner engagement rather than passively absorbing information. Course provides some specific details and/or examples that tools used in the course promote active learner engagement rather than passively absorbing information. Course does not provide specific details and/or examples of how the tools used in the course promote active learner engagement rather than passively absorbing information.
Learning Objectives Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Course and module/unit level objectives stated clearly and prominently in the course and syllabus
  • Objectives are written as measurable outcomes
  • Learning objectives written from the learner’s perspective and allow learners to easily grasp their meaning and expected outcomes
Course provides some evidence of:
  • Course and module/unit level objectives stated clearly and prominently in the course or syllabus
  • Objective written to reflect learning outcomes; however, not all are written as measurable outcomes
  • Learning objectives are not written from the learner’s perspective and/or are use discipline jargon, unexplained terminology, and/or complex language
Objectives are not easily located within the course. Objectives are missing and/or poorly written.


The Innovative Design Award recognizes a course that uses unique design aspects as a means to deliver quality course content either within or outside of the learning management system.

Innovative Course Design Rubric
Faculty Choice Award

Criteria Exemplary (2) Accomplished (1) Incomplete (0)
Learning Objectives Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Course and module/unit level objectives stated clearly and prominently in the course and syllabus
  • Objectives written as measurable outcomes
  • Learning objectives written from the learner’s perspective and allow learners to easily grasp their meaning and expected outcomes
Course provides some evidence of:
  • Course and module/unit level objectives stated clearly and prominently in the course or syllabus
  • Objectives are written to reflect learning outcomes; however, not all are written as measurable outcomes
  • Learning objectives are not written from the learner’s perspective and/or are use discipline jargon, unexplained terminology, and/or unnecessary complex language
Objectives are not easily located within the course. Objectives are missing and/or poorly written.
Content Presentation

Course provides specific evidence of:

  • Content made available or “chunked” in manageable segments and presented in distinct learning units or modules
  • Navigation is intuitive and content flows in a logical progression
  • Content is enhanced with visual and auditory elements

Course provides some evidence of:

  • Some content segments are overly large or possibly too small for the specified objectives
  • Navigation is somewhat intuitive but some “exploring” is required by the learner
  • Visual and/or auditory elements occasionally enhance the content.
Course does not provide specific details and/or evidence that content is “chunked” into manageable segments. Navigation is not intuitive and the flow of content is unclear. No visual or auditory elements are used to enhance the content.
Communication Strategies

Course provides specific evidence of:

  • Numerous opportunities for synchronous and/or asynchronous interaction, as appropriate
  • Asynchronous communication strategies promote critical reflection or other higher order thinking aligned with learning objectives
  • Synchronous communication activities benefit from real-time interactions and facilitate “rapid response” communication (i.e., students gain practice discussing course content extemporaneously without looking up basic, declarative information)

Course provides some evidence of:

  • Communication strategies. However, they may not consistently reinforce desired learning outcomes
  • Asynchronous communications are focused primarily on lower levels of thinking (e.g., summarizing, describing, interpreting, etc.)
  • Synchronous interactions are used mostly for instructor explanation or clarification of content, or other instructor-focused activities
Little to no attention is devoted to communication strategies. Interaction activities do not invoke critical thinking, reinforce learning, or take advantage of the specific strengths of the communication tools used.
Assessment Design

Course provides specific evidence of:

  • Assessments appear to measure the performance they aim to measure 
  • Requires higher order thinking is required (e.g., analysis, problem-solving, etc.
  • Assessment activities may focus on tasks similar to real-world application of skills
  • Assessment activities occur frequently throughout the duration of the course
  • Uses multiple types of assessments (research project, objective test, discussions, etc.)

Course provides specific evidence of:

  • Assessments appear to measure the performance they aim to measure 
  • Requires higher order thinking is required (e.g., analysis, problem-solving, etc.
  • Assessment activities may focus on tasks similar to real-world application of skills
  • Assessment activities occur frequently throughout the duration of the course
  • Uses multiple types of assessments (research project, objective test, discussions, etc.)
The vast majority of assessments require only low-level thinking (memorization, for example). Does not typically include assessment activities that are relevant beyond the scope of the course; multiple assessments are included. Includes a minimum of two types of assessments.


The Best Use of Technology Award recognizes outstanding and creative use of appropriate educational technologies that enhance the learning environment for learners in the course.

Best Use of Technology
Faculty Choice Award

Criteria Exemplary (2) Accomplished (1) Incomplete (0)
Imaginative Approach Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Technology used creatively in ways that transcend traditional, teacher- centered instruction
  • Tools available with Canvas are used to facilitate learning by engaging students with course content
  • An effort has been made to use low-cost or no-cost materials when available
Course provides some evidence of:
  • Tools available within Canvas could be utilized more creatively to engage learners with course content
  • There is some variety in the tool used to deliver instruction
There is very little variety in use of technologies. Tools available within Canvas are not used to their full extent or not used when it would be appropriate. Technologies within the course are used in many cases merely to replicate traditional face-to-face instruction. 
Course tools promote learner engagement and active learning Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Tools used support a community of learning through both asynchronous and synchronous opportunities for communication, interactivity, and transfer of learning
  • Tools used foster teaching presence via active monitoring, engagement and feedback delivery
  • Tools used enhances targeted cognitive tasks, facilitates higher order thinking and provides formative feedback to the learners.
Course provides some evidence of:
  • Tools supporting a community of learning through either asynchronous or synchronous opportunities for communication, interactivity, and transfer of learning
  • Tools have limited functionality to effectively support an instructor’s ability to be present with learners 
  • Tools used enhances some of the following areas: targeted cognitive tasks, facilitates higher order thinking or provides formative feedback to the learners.
Tools used in the course do not support communication, interactivity or transfer of learning. Tools used do not enhance the instructor’s presence in the course. No evidence that the tools used foster engagement or add opportunities for formative feedback. 
Tool Logistics Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Clear explanations of optional and/or required software including any additional costs are provided within the course
  • Instructions are written clearly and with sufficient detail to ensure understanding
Course provides some evidence of:
  • There may be some explanation of how tool use will be scored/ graded
  • Instructions lack detail that would help students understand how to complete the activities
Expectations or grading criteria related to tools and technology are not provided. Instructions on tools are limited or absent. 


The Online Course of the Year Award recognizes an instructor whose QM certified course promotes excellent pedagogical design and innovation in online teaching and learning.

Online Course of the Year
Faculty Choice Award

Criteria Exemplary (2) Accomplished (1) Incomplete (0)
Instructor Facilitation Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Gained and maintained learner attention by establishing relevance of content.
  • Provided an opportunity for students to connect learning to future applications (learning transfer).
  • Fostered a favorable attitude toward learning (example: displaying enthusiasm about the subject). 
  • Provide clear, timely, relevant, and specific feedback. Provide opportunities for learners to request clarification. Use a variety of clarification and feedback strategies. 
  • Anticipated and addressed situations that may impact learning and performance.
Course provides some evidence of:
  • Gained and maintained learner attention by establishing relevance of content but did not provide an opportunity for students to connect learning to future applications
  • Feedback provided only when connected to the results of an assessment.  
There is very little variety in use of technologies. Tools available within Canvas are not used to their full extent or not used when it would be appropriate. Technologies within the course are used to many cases merely to replicate traditional face-to-face instruction. 
Innovative Approach Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Innovative instructional approaches that consistently make a significant impact
  • Unique, engaging, creative, original contributions that disrupt the norm and meet a proven need 
  • Innovative approaches to content delivery and promoting student engagement
  • Incorporates opportunities for students to demonstrate learning in creative ways
Course provides some evidence of:
  • innovations that contain some unique, engaging, creative, original component
Very little evidence of innovative or unique online teaching and learning
Affordability Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Total Cost of course materials not exceeding $30 per credit hour.
Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Total Cost of course materials not exceeding $100.
An effort has been made to use low-cost however the total cost of course materials exceed $100.
Learner Feedback Course provides specific evidence of:
  • Learners having the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design and course content both during course delivery and after course completion 
  • Feedback mechanisms allow students to participate anonymously in course evaluation
  • “Just in time” implementation of feedback during the course. 
Course provides some evidence of:
  • Learners having the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design or course content, but only after course completion
  • Implementation of learner feedback.
  • Learners have the opportunity to give feedback to the instructor regarding course design or course content, but only after course completion
  • No evidence of feedback implementation provided.

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